1. austinkleon:

Nathaniel Philbrick, Why Read Moby-Dick?

This book simultaneously demystifies the writing of Moby-Dick while also romantically propping Melville up as some sort of God/prophet of American literature. Of course, my favorite bits concerned Melville’s influences: Philbrick cites meeting Nathaniel Hawthorne and reading Shakespeare at a later age as the major events that lead to the book becoming what it is now. Turns out—surprise!—Melville was an artful thief:

Melville drew upon his own personal experiences in his novels, but he was also a great pillager of other writers’ prose. During the composition of Moby-Dick he acquired a virtual library of whaling-related books, and passages from these works inevitably made their way into his novel. The writing process for Melville was as much about responding to and incorporting the works of others as it was about relying on his own experiences.

The book’s a quick 125 pages, and worth the read if you a) plan on reading/have read Moby-Dick b) don’t want to bother reading it but want to know what the fuss is all about.

    austinkleon:

    Nathaniel Philbrick, Why Read Moby-Dick?

    This book simultaneously demystifies the writing of Moby-Dick while also romantically propping Melville up as some sort of God/prophet of American literature. Of course, my favorite bits concerned Melville’s influences: Philbrick cites meeting Nathaniel Hawthorne and reading Shakespeare at a later age as the major events that lead to the book becoming what it is now. Turns out—surprise!—Melville was an artful thief:

    Melville drew upon his own personal experiences in his novels, but he was also a great pillager of other writers’ prose. During the composition of Moby-Dick he acquired a virtual library of whaling-related books, and passages from these works inevitably made their way into his novel. The writing process for Melville was as much about responding to and incorporting the works of others as it was about relying on his own experiences.

    The book’s a quick 125 pages, and worth the read if you a) plan on reading/have read Moby-Dick b) don’t want to bother reading it but want to know what the fuss is all about.

  2. weandthecolor:

Ligature
Typographic poster design by Tom Davie.
“Typographic education poster that displays a collection of Oldstyle serif ligatures (connected letterforms).”
More typography inspiration.
posted byW.A.T.C. // Facebook // Twitter // Google+

    weandthecolor:

    Ligature

    Typographic poster design by Tom Davie.

    “Typographic education poster that displays a collection of Oldstyle serif ligatures (connected letterforms).”

    More typography inspiration.

    posted by
    W.A.T.C. // Facebook // Twitter // Google+

  3. slaughterhouse90210:

“Youth is the only sexy tragedy. It’s James Dean jumping into his Porsche Spyder, it’s Marilyn heading off to bed.” — Michael Cunningham, By Nightfall

    slaughterhouse90210:

    “Youth is the only sexy tragedy. It’s James Dean jumping into his Porsche Spyder, it’s Marilyn heading off to bed.”
    — Michael Cunningham, By Nightfall

  4. npr:

heyelise: Fun with pie charts…

    npr:

    heyelise: Fun with pie charts…

About me

I'm an English and journalism major from Indiana University who lives in Indianapolis and works for The Bluevine Collective.

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